The world four degrees warmer: flooded, starving, and broke

BusinessGreen staff
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As the Cancun Summit kicks off, scientists outline the catastrophic scale of the climate change threat

Scientists have warned that increases in global average temperatures of four degrees Celsius, resulting in drought, desertification and rapid sea level rise, could be terrifyingly real by 2060. A lack...

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